Gen Z is from Mars, millennials are from…the same planet?

Presenting Generation ZThey’re lazy and unaware, on their phones too much and would rather “talk” to you through a screen than face-to-face.

These are just a handful of the stereotypes that plague Generation Z — today’s teens and those in their early 20s.

But as this group enters the work force, one of the biggest things HR professional Jeanne Albert said she’s read about the Internet Generation is the ‘two years and they’re out’ phenomenon when it comes to sticking to jobs.

“I think that’s going to be really hard to swallow,” she said.

It’s something the Baby Boomer generation might see as job hopping as they pore over resumes, though I’m not entirely sure that’s a fair assumption.

As part of the often-criticized millennial generation myself, I can relate.

Take a look at my resume over the past five years, and you’ll see I’ve held five jobs, including two here at the Spec and have gone back to school for a graduate degree.

Does that mean I’m not committed to the companies I work for? I would say no.

To me, the switch-ups are more reflective of the changing times — a mix of contract work, looking for a place that provides mentorship and valuing opportunities for advancement.

Or maybe this means I have more in common with the post-millennial tidal wave than I originally thought….

Take a look at this month’s Hamilton Business cover story Presenting Generation Z to get a glimpse of what makes the Internet Generation tick, to see how they’re different (or similar) to millennials and to learn how to lure them and keep them at your company.

One thought on “Gen Z is from Mars, millennials are from…the same planet?

  1. I’m Generation X, and I’ve found this problem. It’s funny for the employers to look down their noses and say the youth are the problem, but the problem is more like what you’ve stated – “To me, the switch-ups are more reflective of the changing times — a mix of contract work, looking for a place that provides mentorship and valuing opportunities for advancement.”
    I also have a few jobs on my resume, and it’s not for lack of wanting a permanent place. I would LOVE to stick at one job for 30+ years and be able to comfortably support myself! But good luck finding that anymore. It’s all contracts, permanent part-time and/or casual. Many places keep your for your 3 month probation, and then find some reason to fire you so they can hire someone new at minimum wage. If you get part time, you’re always on the look-out for full time, because trying to obtain a SECOND part time job to make ends meet is like pulling teeth. Employers don’t want to be flexible with scheduling, despite only offering part time, so they should assume that their employees will likely need two jobs.
    So again, the employers are looking down their noses and judging the youth left right and center – but in how many of those cases are the employers the ones causing the problems?

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